Join Ben Crawford, AIA, 2022 President of AIA Dallas, as he introduces Nicki Marrone, AIA, President-Elect of TxA.  The Texas Society of Architects is a state component of the American Institute of Architects.  It's mission is to be the voice for Texas architecture, supporting the creation of safe, beautiful, sustainable environments.

Nicole Marrone, AIA, is a principal at Alamo Architects in San Antonio, where she serves as a leader of the firm’s K-12 studio.

Marrone received a Bachelor of Arts from Rice University in 1998 and a Bachelor of Architecture in 2000, also from Rice. She gained experience working in a few firms during school, including a preceptorship at Kohn Pedersen Fox in London. Following graduation, she opted to stay in Texas and moved to San Antonio shortly thereafter.

In addition to K-12 work, she has worked on master planning and commercial projects. She has also lead the sustainability efforts for Alamo Architects, attaining a LEED Silver Certification for the firm’s own office campus in 2008. Her work on education projects has been extensive, ranging from specialty career technology programs to a new 430,000 sf comprehensive high school for Northside ISD, the fourth largest school district in the state.

Over the years, her service to the profession has grown from leading the local chapter’s COTE committee to serving as AIA San Antonio’s chapter president in 2015. She previously served in various roles on Texas Society of Architects’ Board of Directors, as well as chairing the Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion Taskforce and the 2021 Conference Committee. Over the course of her professional practice, she has developed a passion advocating for students, especially encouraging young women into design and STEAM fields. 

Raising two young boys with her husband, Steve, (also an architect who now practices law) has shaped her outlook on encouraging future leaders and what it takes to build a stronger community. She regularly participates in mentoring events, career days, and other programs to educate youth about architecture’s impact on society and career opportunities for all. 

Her hope for the coming year is to increase her understanding of each of the components across the state. Says Marrone, “Not only is the way we practice a different experience for everyone, but so is the path to becoming an architect. Expanding the pipeline, and building equity in the profession will require us all to seek other perspectives of what we do.”